THE WOOD GLOSSARY




Wood terms beginning with:

A B C D E F G H IJK L M N O PQ R S T UV W XYZ


Imported - Lumber that doesn't grow in the United States.

Infeed - The direction a work piece is fed into a blade or cutter.

Incipient decay - The early stage of decay in which the disintegration has not proceeded far enough to soften or otherwise perceptibly change the quality of the wood (See spalting).

Intergrown knot - One partially or completely intergrown on one or two faces with the growth rings of the surrounding wood.

Interlocked-grained wood - 1) Grain in which the fibers put on for several years may slope in a right-handed direction, and then for a number of years the slope reverses to a left-hand direction, and later changes back to a right-handed pitch, and so on. Such wood is exceedingly difficult to split radially, though tangentially it may split fairly easily.
- 2) Grain in which the direction of the longitudinal fibers alternates to the right and left at intervals, resulting in a ribbon-stripe figure on the quartersawn surface.

Joist - Pieces (nominal dimensions 2 to 4 inches in thickness by 5 inches and wider) of rectangular cross section graded with respect to strength in bending when loaded on the narrow face: used as supporting members under a floor or over a ceiling.

Juvenile wood - Wood formed early in the life of a tree. By most measures, juvenile wood is lower in quality than wood that forms later; this is particularly true of the softwoods. Juvenile wood shrinks and swells along the grain as moisture content changes. Strength is lower, and in some cases much lower, than mature wood of the same tree

Kiln - In lumber drying, a kiln is a room or building where temperature, moisture, and the air circulating are controlled to dry wood.

Kiln dried - Lumber which has been dried under conditions of controlled temperatures and humidities in a dry kiln.

Knot - A branch or limb embedded in a tree and cut through in the process of manufacturing. Knots are classified according to size, quality and occurrence. In lumber, the size classifications are: Pin knot, one not over 1/2-inch in diameter; Small, a knot larger than 1/2-inch but not over 3/4-inch; Medium, larger than 3/4-inch but not over 1 1/2-inches; Large, over 1 1/2-inches in diameter. The shape of the knot as it appears on a cut surface depends on the angle of the cut relative to the long axis of the knot.

Knot cluster - Two or more knots grouped together as a unit with the fibers in the wood deflected around the entire unit.



The Wood Glossary






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